Bailey's Tumblings

Celebrating art + tech.

Franz Ackermann is a German artist born in 1963. (With a name like Franz, what other country could he be from?)
Franz’s art is frequently cartoonish and semi-abstract and nearly always exuberant. The works revolve the hectic nature of wandering and travel. His pieces are not maps nor the iconic imagery of postcards, although they may adapt a little of both of those things. As the MoMa puts it:
“[his works] are not meant to record what he sees on his journeys. Instead, Ackermann’s drawings can be understood as landscapes of his mind, attempts to capture his visual experiences in abbreviated, abstract form with intense color.”
In the self portrait above, entitled “Faceland/White Crossing I,” the abbreviated, almost choppy cubist imagery suggests one of those picture collages of John Lennon or Albert Einstein. Akermann reconstructs his face, his own identity, from street-like geometric black, gray and white lines, making it appear marbleized. From below, a spotty trail of blue graffiti orbs creeps upward towards Akermann’s hardened face.
The piece harnesses the frenetic anxiety caused by the saturation of images and symbols we face in today’s world. Such loud colors and exaggerated symbols can harden us till we are gray in the face, or they can be a moment of beauty and vividness amidst the silencing skyscrapers. It just depends on how you see it.

Franz Ackermann is a German artist born in 1963. (With a name like Franz, what other country could he be from?)

Franz’s art is frequently cartoonish and semi-abstract and nearly always exuberant. The works revolve the hectic nature of wandering and travel. His pieces are not maps nor the iconic imagery of postcards, although they may adapt a little of both of those things. As the MoMa puts it:

“[his works] are not meant to record what he sees on his journeys. Instead, Ackermann’s drawings can be understood as landscapes of his mind, attempts to capture his visual experiences in abbreviated, abstract form with intense color.”

In the self portrait above, entitled “Faceland/White Crossing I,” the abbreviated, almost choppy cubist imagery suggests one of those picture collages of John Lennon or Albert Einstein. Akermann reconstructs his face, his own identity, from street-like geometric black, gray and white lines, making it appear marbleized. From below, a spotty trail of blue graffiti orbs creeps upward towards Akermann’s hardened face.

The piece harnesses the frenetic anxiety caused by the saturation of images and symbols we face in today’s world. Such loud colors and exaggerated symbols can harden us till we are gray in the face, or they can be a moment of beauty and vividness amidst the silencing skyscrapers. It just depends on how you see it.

  1. baileye posted this